Category: Children’s Health

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Flu season is near — and it could be a bad one

Categories: Children's Health  /  Flu  /  Infections  /  News  /  Pregnancy

Flu season is just around the corner, and experts predict it could be a bad one. In the Southern Hemisphere, which has an earlier season, the number of lab-confirmed influenza cases was more than double the previous year. In Australia, the virus hit early and sickened record numbers in some areas. “They’re right to be worried about what happened in the Southern Hemisphere,” said Dr. Jason Bowling, an infectious disease specialist at UT Health San Antonio and Hospital Epidemiologist at University Health System. “We could be seeing a bad flu season here this year. We haven’t had one in a …Read More >

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Football season? Watch your head

Categories: Children's Health  /  Emergency care  /  News  /  trauma

Football season is upon us. While that usually means the promise of cooler temperatures and the pleasure of cheering from bleacher seats, it’s also worth keeping in mind the risk of head injuries. It’s a major problem. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate the number of sports-related concussions in the United States at some 1.6 million to 3.8 million each year. Another study puts the odds of an athlete in a contact sport suffering a concussion as high as 19 percent per season. “Our brain is our most valuable resource,” said Dr. Lillian Liao, assistant professor of surgery at …Read More >

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Beware the button

Categories: Children's Health  /  Emergency care  /  News

They’re in all sorts of electronic gadgets and toys. The problem starts when your toddler grabs hold of one. Some call them button batteries because of their resemblance to buttons. But they’re also health hazards if a young child swallows them. The large 3-volt lithium batteries are especially dangerous because they react with saliva to generate a chemical reaction that can cause serious damage to tissues and even death. “Because it is a battery, the circuit can be completed,” Dr. Tim McEvoy, an emergency medicine physician at University Health System, said in an interview on KSAT’s SA Live program. “ …Read More >

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A campaign for smoke-free kids

Categories: Children's Health  /  Heart Health  /  News

San Antonio’s health director, Colleen Bridger, said this week she wants to raise the age limit for buying tobacco products in the city from 18 to 21 — a campaign known as Tobacco 21. “When you look at what we haven’t yet achieved, (Tobacco 21) is the single most important public health policy we can pass,” Bridger told the Rivard Report. The San Antonio Metropolitan Health District is measuring community support for raising the age limit, with the idea of enacting a local ordinance by the end of the year. Parents probably won’t mind getting a little help in trying …Read More >

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What you need to know about pediatric sports injuries

Categories: Blog  /  Children's Health  /  Emergency care  /  Surgery  /  trauma

This post was first published by Alamo City Moms Blog. A new school year also brings a new season of fall sports. Parents are gearing up for evening practice shuttling, weekends of sideline cheering, and spirited wardrobe upgrades. As much as kids and parents love their sports, the potential for a sports injury is never far from most parents’ minds. Here is some great information from our partners at University Health System and their Pediatric Orthopedic team. University Children’s Health Orthopedic team offers specialized medical care for children who injure themselves playing or participating in sports with a focus of getting …Read More >

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Helping your kids make safe and healthy decisions online

Categories: Blog  /  Children's Health  /  Technology

It seems like almost every week brings a scary new online threat to the safety and well-being of our kids.  Recently, a troubling story made the news regarding an online “game” of increasingly intense and cruel challenges — one that ended tragically for a local teenager. It might feel overwhelming as a parent, helping your child navigate the ever-changing world of apps, games and websites. But the best way to keep your kids safe is to keep open the lines of communication. And if you have a teenager, you know that can be easier said than done. Make a point …Read More >

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Heading off diabetes in the womb?

Categories: Children's Health  /  Diabetes  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

Diabetes runs in families. And for years, doctors have advised those at high risk of diabetes to eat sensibly to prevent getting the disease. Now, a new study involving several San Antonio organizations is asking a seemingly odd question that could have a major impact on the worldwide epidemic of obesity and diabetes: What if that advice should begin before birth? “We’re trying to figure out if babies are preprogrammed to have a certain body composition that depends on the maternal-fetal environment,” said Dr. Cynthia Blanco, medical director of the Neonatal Nutrition & Bone Institute at University Health System, and …Read More >

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What not to wear in the pool

Categories: Children's Health  /  News

Ask any kid. Summer means fun in the water — be it the pool, the water park, the lake or the beach. For parents, that means providing young and inexperienced swimmers with a little help in the form of personal flotation devices. But not all flotation devices are created equal, said Jennifer Northway, director of the Adult and Pediatric Injury Prevention Program at University Health System. All sorts of inflatable novelty items can be found at the neighborhood store. But steer clear of those in favor of U.S. Coast Guard-approved personal flotation devices for young children. Approved vests will say …Read More >

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Summon the babysitter!

Categories: Children's Health  /  News

It’s been a long week. You need a night out. Time to call the babysitter. But finding a good babysitter takes a little time, planning and research. If you’re looking for someone to take care of your child for a few hours, don’t wait until the last minute. Here are a few things to think about: Look for a sitter within your circle of friends, church or community. Look for a sitter who is 13 years or older and mature enough to handle basic household emergencies. Look for someone who already works with children. Have the sitter spend time with …Read More >

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Health in the headlines

Categories: Cancer  /  Children's Health  /  News  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

Need to catch up on the latest health news? We’ve gathered the highlights for you. Are you thinking of moving to the North Pole to avoid mountain cedar? You might want to consider nose filters. Can your nose tell the difference between hyacinth and honeysuckle at 100 yards? It might be a detriment to your waistline. Are your hunger pangs in pregnancy steering you toward the candy aisle? And a hair-preserving cap for chemo patients has been expanded for a wider range of cancer types. Allergies are making you sneeze. Would putting a filter in your nose help? — Washington …Read More >

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