Category: Children’s Health

A multi-ethnic group of elementary age children are learning how to swim at the public pool. One little girl is holding onto a kick board and is swimming through the water.

Summer safety tips: Keeping your kids safe in the water this summer

There’s nothing like spending a hot Texas summer day lounging in a pool, lake or river. However, as families head to the water this summer to cool off, it’s important that they remember the importance of practicing good water safety. Who is Most at Risk from Drowning? According to the World Health Organization, drowning is the third leading cause of unintentional injury death worldwide with an estimated 360,000 deaths from drowning each year. Each day in the United States, 10 people drown. Of these, two are 14 years old or younger. Often, young children are the most at risk of …Read More >

Signs along the new fitness trail at the San Antonio Zoo, sponsored by University Health System

Trick your kids into moving (off the sofa)

Categories: Children's Health  /  News

“Mom! I’m bored!” Summer is here, school is out and the kids are probably staring at an electronic device of some sort instead of being active. To remedy that, University Health System and San Antonio Zoo have teamed up to provide guests of all ages with a way to combine fitness and fun. The Zoo’s new Fitness Trail is a one-mile loop that connects guests with some major animal exhibits, and includes signs that help  track their progress at each quarter-mile mark. Signs also include encouraging fitness facts that offer motivation and inspiration. “Too often during the summer break, kids are parked …Read More >

Tags: , , , ,
Heatstroke car

Summer Safety Tips: Preventing Hot Car Deaths

Categories: Children's Health  /  Emergency care  /  News

Summer is here and for many of us it’s a time to kick back, relax and enjoy the hot summer days.  However, it’s important to remember that those hot summer days can be dangerous, especially to children, who are more susceptible to the heat. And one of the places kids are most vulnerable are in hot cars. According to Dr. Mark Muir, the trauma medical director at University Hospital, “Kids are smaller and they just have less surface area so they can’t get rid of heat as quickly. Adults, we sweat, we get rid of heat a lot faster. In …Read More >

Community Trauma Report cover photo, trauma team working on injured patient

New report shows rise in gunshot wounds in children and motorcycle crashes

Categories: Children's Health  /  Emergency care  /  News  /  trauma

University Health System released its fifth Community Trauma Report last week, identifying serious injury trends in Bexar County and South Texas based on the thousands of adults and children treated in University Hospital’s level I trauma center and level I pediatric trauma center each year. University Hospital treated 1,932 children and 5,361 adults with serious injuries in 2017. Those numbers have risen steadily over several years, in large part because it serves one of the fastest growing regions in the country. Among all patients, both children and adults, falls were the leading injury cause, followed by car crashes, burns, people …Read More >

Tags: , , , ,
Sunburned back with 'help' written in sunscreen

Yes, it’s hot. Don’t roast

Categories: Children's Health  /  Emergency care  /  News

The official start to summer is June 21. Tell that to the sun. South Texas temperatures have already pushed past the 90-degree mark and show no sign of stopping. With that much energy from the sun bombarding us all, it’s important to take some precautions to keep from getting burned, dehydrated — or worse. With that in mind, we’re recycling a helpful interview on sun safety we did last year with Dr. Bruce Adams, chair of emergency medicine at University Hospital and UT Health San Antonio. Stay safe out there! When too much sun makes summer less fun

Tags: , , ,
Amber Zepeda, born at 24 weeks weighing only a pound

A medical miracle

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy  /  Research  /  Surgery

Halfway through what would have been a normal pregnancy, Adriana Zepeda went into premature labor with her second child. She delivered little Amber at 24 weeks gestation and a birth weight of just over one pound.To put it into context, a normal pregnancy is 40 weeks. Prematurity is considered a birth before 37 weeks. Any baby born at 25 weeks or earlier is considered extremely premature. It wasn’t that long ago that babies such as Amber would not have survived, said Dr. Cynthia Blanco, medical director of the Neonatal Nutrition & Bone Institute at University Health System and professor of …Read More >

Tags: ,
Alma Arellano, 1, who received a living donor liver transplant at University Hospital

A selfless act for a gravely ill child

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  Transplants

Six weeks after she was born, Alma Arellano of Brownsville was diagnosed with biliary atresia, a serious liver disorder in which the bile ducts aren’t working properly. Within days, she underwent surgery at University Hospital to restore the flow of bile from her liver. While the ducts were repaired, Alma developed a series of infections that eventually caused her liver to fail. And because of her tiny size, it proved difficult to find a size-matched deceased donor liver to transplant into her. “She was literally slipping away from us,” said Dr. Francisco Cigarroa, the Carlos and Malú Alvarez University Distinguished …Read More >

Tags: , ,
baby within reach of household chemicals under sink

Keeping your kids from making a toxic mistake

Categories: Children's Health  /  Emergency care  /  News

Through the eyes of a toddler, the world is a collection of fascinating shapes and sizes and colors. Some of those colorful shapes contain things that taste pretty good when Mom or Dad pour them into a bowl or cup. The problem is when things that don’t taste so good — that might even be poisonous — come in similar colorful shapes. And curious kids decide to take matters into their own hands — grabbing the big bottle of disinfecting cleanser that looks a lot like apple juice — when their frazzled parents step out of sight. “A lot of …Read More >

Tags: , , ,
Young child with baseball wearing catcher's vest

A watchful eye on sports injuries

Categories: Children's Health  /  Emergency care  /  News  /  trauma

Spring means baseball. And with baseball — and many other sports — it also means parents need to keep a watchful eye open for injuries in their young athletes. Dr. Caitlyn Mooney, a pediatrician with University Medicine Associates, urges parents to take sports injuries seriously. Kids can have special issues when it comes to injuries. They also need plenty of time to heal. With children specializing in a specific sport at an early age, they run the risk of injuries from overuse. In baseball, that might mean a pitcher not resting an arm. Running and jumping can lead to more than …Read More >

Tags: , , ,
Mother taking a sick child's temperature

Fever 101

Categories: Children's Health  /  Emergency care  /  Infections  /  News

Fever. It’s often the first thing we check our kids for when they feel sick. But how to treat that fever — and when to worry about it — isn’t always clear. The first thing to know is that a fever isn’t an illness, but rather a symptom. It’s a sign your child’s body is fighting an illness or infection. Fever stimulates the body’s defenses, sending white blood cells and other “fighter” cells to attack and destroy the cause of the infection. A fever is generally considered to be a temperature of 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit or higher, according to the American …Read More >

Tags:

< Older Posts

Featured Video

Upcoming Events

  • Mon
    02
    Jul
    2018
    4 p.m. to 5 p.m.University Hospital, 4502 Medical Drive
  • Mon
    06
    Aug
    2018
    4 p.m. to 5 p.m.University Hospital, 4502 Medical Drive
  • Mon
    10
    Sep
    2018
    4 p.m. to 5 p.m.University Hospital, 4502 Medical Drive
  • Mon
    01
    Oct
    2018
    4 p.m. to 5 p.m.University Hospital, 4502 Medical Drive
  • Mon
    05
    Nov
    2018
    4 p.m. to 5 p.m.University Hospital, 4502 Medical Drive
  • Mon
    03
    Dec
    2018
    4 p.m. to 5 p.m.University Hospital, 4502 Medical Drive
Download the University Health System App