Category: Heart Health

06/10/2008 133630 -- San Antonio, TX..

A safer way to repair hearts and reduce the risk of kidney damage

Categories: Heart Health  /  News  /  Surgery  /  Technology

The ability of doctors to thread catheters and stents through blood vessels has transformed medicine — often providing an alternative to big incisions and long recovery times. More than a million catheterizations to repair the heart and its vessels are performed in the United States each year. But for some patients with kidney disease, those catheter procedures come with a big asterisk. Contrast dye, used to allow doctors to see blockages and other problems, can be toxic. Healthy kidneys can flush the dye out of the body quickly after a procedure. But for patients with poorly functioning kidneys, the dye …Read More >

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A new option for a fluttering heart

Categories: Heart Health  /  News

Atrial fibrillation is a fairly common problem affecting the heart’s rhythm. An estimated 6 million Americans have it. It’s also a major risk factor for stroke. Medication can help many with atrial fibrillation. But for others, a new procedure called Watchman offers an alternative. It creates a physical barrier that catches clots and prevents them from traveling to the brain. Dr. Manoj Panday, a cardiologist and head of cardiac electrophysiology at UT Health San Antonio, performs the procedure at University Hospital. He told KENS TV that most patients who undergo the procedure are able to stop taking blood-thinning drugs, which …Read More >

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Ganging up on high blood pressure

Categories: Diabetes  /  Heart Health  /  News  /  Research

High blood pressure affects a third of U.S. adults. It’s undertreated and hard to manage. But a new team approach underway at University Health System clinics is showing promising results. When high blood pressure isn’t controlled, it can contribute to heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and diabetes complications. Typically, in most settings, treatment involves a brief chat with a physician, followed by a prescription for a hypertension medicine. Controlling blood pressure, however, is more successful when a number of factors are addressed. The team approach being studied at University Health System involves getting the physician a little help. That includes …Read More >

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05/31/2010 195105 -- San Antonio, TX..University Hospital - Living Proof TV and Print Ad Campaign - 2011..Cath Lab - Dr. S. Hinan Ahmed M.D

Pinpointing the source of heart disease

Categories: Heart Health  /  News

When Antonio Vargas became too weak to do the things he enjoyed, his daughter Mimi Cruz brought him in for care. Doctors at the Heart and Vascular Institute at University Health System threaded a catheter to the vessels leading to his heart and found blockage in multiple vessels. They treated him with medication until he became strong enough to undergo a second procedure to open a vessel and implant a stent. Cardiac catheterization is an important diagnostic tool in determining heart disease. Mr. Vargas’s story, one in a series of stories that make up the Real Men Wear Gowns campaign, …Read More >

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A simple test to detect heart problems in babies

Categories: Children's Health  /  Heart Health  /  News  /  Pregnancy

The idea was that a simple, noninvasive test could detect undiagnosed heart problems in healthy looking newborns before they leave the hospital. Dr. Alice Gong, a neonatologist at University Hospital and professor of pediatrics at UT Health San Antonio, was at the forefront of pushing for Texas hospitals to perform the test, called pulse oximetry, which measures the oxygen level in blood. A state law made the test mandatory for hospitals that deliver babies. And new study published this month in the American Journal of Perinatology confirmed the test is valuable. It looked at an early group of 11,322 babies …Read More >

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Making a lifesaving operation even safer

Categories: Children's Health  /  Heart Health  /  News  /  rehabilitation

It is one of modern medicine’s great advances — the ability of surgeons to repair congenital heart defects in very young patients.  Over the years, both surgical techniques and technology have improved so that these very sick kids are surviving and living long, productive lives. Dr. Andrew Meyer wants to make that surgery even safer. Dr. Meyer, a pediatric critical care specialist who also is a biomedical engineer, is taking aim at a complication that can arise when some patients are hooked up to heart-lung bypass machines — the devices that make open heart surgery possible. In a small percentage …Read More >

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Fixing a faulty valve

Categories: Heart Health  /  News  /  rehabilitation  /  Surgery

Healthy hearts need healthy valves. But when those valves start to malfunction, it can cause symptoms that may not lead people to think of the correct cause. “People tend to think that this is old age and they don’t get it checked out,” said Dr. Edward Sako, professor of cardiothoracic surgery at UT Health San Antonio who practices at University Health System. “The patient may feel fine.” Dr. Sako said people face two common problems with their heart valves. One is stenosis, or narrowing, where the valve doesn’t open well. The other is regurgitation, where it doesn’t close well. It …Read More >

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Could your child have high blood pressure?

Categories: Children's Health  /  Heart Health  /  News

You may think high blood pressure is a health burden only for adults. But it can strike children, too, especially if they are overweight or obese. Unfortunately, the condition may not always be recognized or treated in the young, a recent study found. If you are a parent, you can take steps to protect your child from this health problem. Read more in University Health System’s Health Library.

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Help for high blood pressure

Categories: Heart Health  /  News  /  Wellness

Hypertension — commonly known as high blood pressure — is the leading cause of stroke and heart attack. And while the condition is controllable, it is also silent – and therefore deadly. It’s also easy to check while at the doctor’s office, or even at the grocery or drug store, said Dr. Carolyn Eaton, a family medicine physician with Community Medicine Associates, the nonprofit physician group for University Health System. “The (blood pressure devices) in the stores aren’t bad — maybe a little on the high side for seniors,” but can indicate if you should follow up with your doctor, she said. …Read More >

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Making e-cigarettes less appealing to teens

Categories: Cancer  /  Children's Health  /  Heart Health  /  News

Many kids think e-cigs are a healthy alternative to smoking cigarettes. That’s no surprise, said Dr. Ryan Van Ramshorst of University Health System’s Community Medicine Associates. Talking to KSAT’s Adrian Garcia about a CDC report on rising e-cigarette use among youth in the United States, Dr. Van Ramshorst predicted the numbers will get worse before they get better, but that legislation can help. “I think at least in the short term (youth e-cigarette use) is going to continue to increase,” Dr. Van Ramshorst said, “and a big factor contributing to this is the advertising that’s being put forth by the …Read More >

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