Category: Heart Health

University Health System Fitness on the Plaza classes at the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts

Finding fitness among the crowd

Categories: Heart Health  /  News  /  Wellness

Some among us would rather climb the steep trail to physical fitness on their own. These often are people who prefer to sweat in private. A few may even be antisocial. But for others who find comfort and support in a crowd of fellow fitness aficionados, we have a pretty good option that’s light on the wallet. Twice a month, University Health System sponsors Fitness on the Plaza, a series of free fitness activities at the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts. All classes, led by area fitness instructors, take place on the lovely Will Naylor Smith River Walk Plaza. From yoga …Read More >

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Older adults preparing a healthy meal

Schooling adults on the best ways to lose weight and stay healthy

Categories: Diabetes  /  Heart Health  /  News  /  Research

For more than 20 years, a bilingual school health program known as Bienestar, the brainchild of Dr. Roberto Trevino, has been teaching elementary and middle school students throughout San Antonio and South Texas the skills to stay healthy and avoid the twin epidemics of obesity and diabetes. University Health System provided some early funding and support for the work. On Valentine’s Day, Dr. Trevino — director of the Social & Health Research Center in San Antonio — held a news conference at University Health System’s Texas Diabetes Institute to discuss a newly published study that took elements of his Bienestar program …Read More >

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Man having blood pressure checked with cuff

Lowering blood pressure one roadblock at a time

Categories: Heart Health  /  News  /  Wellness

To get James Robbins’ high blood pressure under control, the first step was to help him quit smoking. But to reach that point required a bit of soul searching on Mr. Robbins’ part. He had long known he had high blood pressure. But had managed to ignore the significance of his condition for some years, even trying to game the regular physicals that were required for his work as a commercial diver. “I’d kind of starve myself and I wouldn’t drink sodas before the physicals,” Mr. Robbins said. “I’d have them do the tests manually, which brings it down a …Read More >

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Doctor drawing a red heart and EKG rhythm

Heeding the signs of heart disease

Categories: Heart Health  /  News

Heart disease kills one out of every four people who die in the United States each year. Many of those deaths can be prevented, and during American Heart Month — observed throughout February each year — University Health System will be working with its partners to spread the word about ways to lower your risk. Dr. Hinan Ahmed, medical director of the Cardiac Catheterization Lab at University Health System, said heart catheterization is useful for learning more when a patient has had abnormal results on a stress test. It involves threading a tiny tube with a camera through an artery in the wrist or groin …Read More >

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Young woman taking care of older woman with the flu

The flu can raise the risk of heart attack

Categories: Flu  /  Heart Health  /  News

The news about flu this season just keeps getting worse. Not only has this been a really bad influenza season by most accounts, but a newly published study now adds a lot more evidence to the notion that flu also raises the risk of heart attacks — a life-threatening connection that was long suspected but never proven. The study by Canadian researchers, published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine, examined test results from nearly 20,000 adults in Ontario with lab-confirmed flu between 2009 and 2014, and matched them to hospital records. That allowed them to see which patients with lab-confirmed flu had heart attacks. They found patients …Read More >

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A stoplight flashes yellow in the middle of a city

A yellow caution light for high blood pressure

Categories: Heart Health  /  News

So your doctor says you’ve got prehypertension. Two questions: What the heck is prehypertension? And now what? Prehypertension identifies people at risk of developing chronic high blood pressure if they don’t take steps to improve their lifestyle habits. Someone who ends up with full-blown high blood pressure may, in time, develop heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness or dementia. They may have to stay on prescription drugs for life. The “prehypertension” numbers to remember are 120 over 80 up to 139 over 89. That reading should be seen as a yellow light. According to guidelines issued by the federal government, …Read More >

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A person in a blue shirt reaches into a pack of cigarettes

A campaign for smoke-free kids

Categories: Children's Health  /  Heart Health  /  News

San Antonio’s health director, Colleen Bridger, said this week she wants to raise the age limit for buying tobacco products in the city from 18 to 21 — a campaign known as Tobacco 21. “When you look at what we haven’t yet achieved, (Tobacco 21) is the single most important public health policy we can pass,” Bridger told the Rivard Report. The San Antonio Metropolitan Health District is measuring community support for raising the age limit, with the idea of enacting a local ordinance by the end of the year. Parents probably won’t mind getting a little help in trying …Read More >

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A young woman sleeps on a bed in silk pajamas

Can’t sleep? It might be making you sick

Categories: Heart Health  /  News

Can’t get a good night sleep? You’re not alone. Several problems can contribute to poor sleep, but snoring is one of the most common and obvious – if not for the snorer, then for the spouse. Snoring can be a sign of obstructive sleep apnea, a condition in which the sleeper’s airway is temporarily blocked, causing the sleeper to gasp for air multiple times a night. Airways can be blocked by the tissues of the soft palate or the tonsils, or sometimes by fat in the neck. The sleeper often is not aware they’re waking up, but may feel sleepy or …Read More >

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Three senior women smile in the pool together

Remember the moon landing? Then you REALLY need some exercise

Categories: Heart Health  /  News

Exercise. Love it or hate it, it’s been described by experts as the closest thing we have to a miracle drug — with so many health benefits confirmed by research that there’s no question that all of us should be working out in some form or another. That includes older adults. Regular exercise is especially important as we age. It improves heart health, maintains a healthy weight, keeps joints flexible and helps improve balance to reduce the risk of falls. But the benefits go beyond even that.  One study found that adults 75 years and older who exercised lived longer than those …Read More >

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A man in a plaid shirt frowns as steam comes out of his ears on an isolated background

Tamping down a hot temper

Categories: Heart Health  /  News

We’ve all felt it — an anger that begins to bubble up inside us during an argument, after a broken promise, or maybe as a result of someone’s rude or thoughtless words or actions. The problem is if anger occurs frequently or intensifies into rage. In those cases, experts say, you might take a few deep breaths and consider a few tips to keep that temper under control. Otherwise, you could be damaging your health. Is it an underlying illness? Frequent feelings of aggression might stem from post-traumatic stress disorder, Alzheimer’s disease, or some other illness. If you suspect that …Read More >

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