Category: NICU

Amber Zepeda, born at 24 weeks weighing only a pound

A medical miracle

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy  /  Research  /  Surgery

Halfway through what would have been a normal pregnancy, Adriana Zepeda went into premature labor with her second child. She delivered little Amber at 24 weeks gestation and a birth weight of just over one pound.To put it into context, a normal pregnancy is 40 weeks. Prematurity is considered a birth before 37 weeks. Any baby born at 25 weeks or earlier is considered extremely premature. It wasn’t that long ago that babies such as Amber would not have survived, said Dr. Cynthia Blanco, medical director of the Neonatal Nutrition & Bone Institute at University Health System and professor of …Read More >

Tags: ,
A female doctor smiles and holds a newborn baby in a medical facility

Heading off diabetes in the womb?

Categories: Children's Health  /  Diabetes  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

Diabetes runs in families. And for years, doctors have advised those at high risk of diabetes to eat sensibly to prevent getting the disease. Now, a new study involving several San Antonio organizations is asking a seemingly odd question that could have a major impact on the worldwide epidemic of obesity and diabetes: What if that advice should begin before birth? “We’re trying to figure out if babies are preprogrammed to have a certain body composition that depends on the maternal-fetal environment,” said Dr. Cynthia Blanco, medical director of the Neonatal Nutrition & Bone Institute at University Health System, and …Read More >

Tags: , ,
A medical professional bottle feeds a newborn baby at the hospital

Strengthening mother-baby bonds in the NICU

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

The bond between mother and newborn is not only powerful, it’s important for the healthy development of the child, research has shown. But when a baby is born too soon or has other medical problems requiring a stay in the neonatal intensive care unit, fear and uncertainty can interfere with the forming of those bonds. “We see moms looking terrified,” Umber Darilek, a registered nurse at University Hospital, told Texas Public Radio reporter Wendy Rigby. “A lot of women don’t know how to approach their babies, especially when there are tubes and lines coming out of all directions.” To try …Read More >

Tags: , , ,
A young baby in yellow lies on a bed smiling with a tube in its nose

A video chat with baby

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy  /  Technology

It’s one of the most joyous times in life — the birth of a baby. But sometimes medical reasons can keep mom and baby apart for hours, days or even weeks. That the time when physical and emotional bonds are formed. And while separation can’t always be avoided, University Health System’s Neonatal Intensive Care Unit is using some popular technology to make it easier on both mother and child. Baby Chat uses iPads and Apple’s FaceTime application to allow the newborns to hear the sound of their mother’s voice, and for moms to see and hear the movement, breathing and …Read More >

Tags: , , ,
A newborn baby girl is wrapped in a striped blanket and wears a pink hat as she lays down

Saving precious sight

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy  /  Research  /  Technology

It’s among the happiest moments for new parents, when their baby makes eye contact and smiles in recognition. But for very premature babies, a common and potentially blinding eye disease can rob families of that moment. More than half of all infants born 10 or more weeks prematurely have some level of retinopathy of prematurity, or ROP — a disease in which blood vessels in the back of the eye grow abnormally. That can lead to scarring and detachment of the retina. About 5 to 8 percent require treatment, which involves destroying the abnormal blood vessels with lasers or a …Read More >

Tags: , , , , , ,
A baby lays on its stomach while holding up one finger and wearing a blue and white striped onesie

A vital ingredient for baby’s health

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy

Are you getting enough iodine in your diet? A new policy statement by a national physicians’ group says there’s a good chance you aren’t — and that’s worrisome if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. It could be risky for your child. Iodine is an essential element for a baby’s brain to develop normally. And if mom gets too little, it can weaken both her and her child’s defenses against certain environmental pollutants — including some found in some foods and public water supplies. The American Academy of Pediatrics said this week that many pregnant and breastfeeding women should be taking iodine supplements …Read More >

Tags: , , , , ,
A medical professional bottle feeds a newborn baby at the hospital

Helping babies who can’t eat

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  NICU

As a newborn, Eluterio Mireles’ tiny body lacked the normal length of intestine needed to properly absorb nutrients through normal feeding. It’s an uncommon problem, but not a rare one. And babies who suffer from it usually are fed intravenously — a therapy known as parenteral nutrition, or PN. While PN has been a lifesaver for babies such as Eluterio, doctors have long known that over many months — often until the intestine matures or an intestinal transplant is performed — PN treatment can damage the liver. Sometimes a liver transplant is required; other times the babies do not survive. …Read More >

Tags: , , , , , ,

Featured Video

Upcoming Events

  • Thu
    23
    Aug
    2018
    10 a.m. to 11 a.m.Robert B. Green Campus, 903 W. Martin St.
  • Fri
    24
    Aug
    2018
    11 a.m. to noonTexas Diabetes Institute, 701 S. Zarzamora St.
  • Mon
    10
    Sep
    2018
    4 p.m. to 5 p.m.University Hospital, 4502 Medical Drive
  • Mon
    01
    Oct
    2018
    4 p.m. to 5 p.m.University Hospital, 4502 Medical Drive
  • Mon
    05
    Nov
    2018
    4 p.m. to 5 p.m.University Hospital, 4502 Medical Drive
  • Mon
    03
    Dec
    2018
    4 p.m. to 5 p.m.University Hospital, 4502 Medical Drive
Download the University Health System App