Category: Research

Amber Zepeda, born at 24 weeks weighing only a pound

A medical miracle

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy  /  Research  /  Surgery

Halfway through what would have been a normal pregnancy, Adriana Zepeda went into premature labor with her second child. She delivered little Amber at 24 weeks gestation and a birth weight of just over one pound.To put it into context, a normal pregnancy is 40 weeks. Prematurity is considered a birth before 37 weeks. Any baby born at 25 weeks or earlier is considered extremely premature. It wasn’t that long ago that babies such as Amber would not have survived, said Dr. Cynthia Blanco, medical director of the Neonatal Nutrition & Bone Institute at University Health System and professor of …Read More >

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Dr. Eugenio Cersosimo

Stopping trouble before it begins

Categories: Diabetes  /  News  /  Research

Diabetes is called a silent epidemic because many people don’t know they have it until the disease does considerable harm to their organs and blood vessels over many years. But for others who fall into the category doctors call prediabetes, they can see it coming. And researchers at the Texas Diabetes Institute are looking at ways of helping them keep it at bay. “It’s very important to be able to find people early, to be able to help them, because once diabetes begins there is no prevention. It’s all treatment,” Dr. Alberto Chavez-Velasquez, an endocrinol ogist and associate professor of medicine …Read More >

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Older adults preparing a healthy meal

Schooling adults on the best ways to lose weight and stay healthy

Categories: Diabetes  /  Heart Health  /  News  /  Research

For more than 20 years, a bilingual school health program known as Bienestar, the brainchild of Dr. Roberto Trevino, has been teaching elementary and middle school students throughout San Antonio and South Texas the skills to stay healthy and avoid the twin epidemics of obesity and diabetes. University Health System provided some early funding and support for the work. On Valentine’s Day, Dr. Trevino — director of the Social & Health Research Center in San Antonio — held a news conference at University Health System’s Texas Diabetes Institute to discuss a newly published study that took elements of his Bienestar program …Read More >

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Hospital staff rushing patient on gurney to the emergency room

Clot-removing treatment can benefit more stroke patients

Categories: Emergency care  /  News  /  Research

TIME IS BRAIN. That’s long been the message from stroke experts — that faster is better when it comes to how quickly people with stroke symptoms get emergency treatment. It’s still the best advice. But unfortunately, many stroke patients fail to get emergency care within the recommended window of time. Now a large new study finds that more people than previously thought can benefit from an emergency clot-removal procedure for the most common type of strokes, and that some patients saw significant improvement even as long as 16 hours from the start of symptoms. Previously, it was thought that patients …Read More >

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A pretty young woman takes a nap in a park with her hat covering her face and a book in her arms on a sunny day

Nap happy

Categories: News  /  Research

For some, the midday call of the hammock or daybed is too tempting to resist. But is an afternoon nap good for you? For those who don’t get enough nighttime sleep — which is most of us — it would seem to make sense. But in fact, the research into napping has presented a mixed picture. Sleep, of course, is vital for good health — both physical and mental. It keeps you alert and focused. It helps process memories. It may even boost your body’s natural defenses, protecting you from illness. But studies looking just at napping have shown some …Read More >

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A female doctor smiles and holds a newborn baby in a medical facility

Heading off diabetes in the womb?

Categories: Children's Health  /  Diabetes  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

Diabetes runs in families. And for years, doctors have advised those at high risk of diabetes to eat sensibly to prevent getting the disease. Now, a new study involving several San Antonio organizations is asking a seemingly odd question that could have a major impact on the worldwide epidemic of obesity and diabetes: What if that advice should begin before birth? “We’re trying to figure out if babies are preprogrammed to have a certain body composition that depends on the maternal-fetal environment,” said Dr. Cynthia Blanco, medical director of the Neonatal Nutrition & Bone Institute at University Health System, and …Read More >

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A golden retriever dog holds a newspaper in its mouth against an isolated background

Health in the headlines

Categories: Cancer  /  Children's Health  /  News  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

Need to catch up on the latest health news? We’ve gathered the highlights for you. Are you thinking of moving to the North Pole to avoid mountain cedar? You might want to consider nose filters. Can your nose tell the difference between hyacinth and honeysuckle at 100 yards? It might be a detriment to your waistline. Are your hunger pangs in pregnancy steering you toward the candy aisle? And a hair-preserving cap for chemo patients has been expanded for a wider range of cancer types. Allergies are making you sneeze. Would putting a filter in your nose help? — Washington …Read More >

An up close view of the word prostate in a dictionary

A more precise way to search for prostate cancers

Categories: Cancer  /  News  /  Research  /  Surgery

For men who undergo a biopsy for prostate cancer, it may come as a surprise to learn that the tiny samples of tissue the doctor removes for testing are based on an educated guess — where in the prostate that cancer is most likely to be lurking. For that reason, a standard biopsy can miss some prostate cancers. “I would describe it like the game of Battleship,” said Dr. Michael Liss, an assistant professor of urology at UT Health San Antonio who practices at University Health System. “That’s kind of where you put the needle: A-1, A-2, B-1, B-2. The …Read More >

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An older male doctor takes the blood pressure of a smiling older woman

Ganging up on high blood pressure

Categories: Diabetes  /  Heart Health  /  News  /  Research

High blood pressure affects a third of U.S. adults. It’s undertreated and hard to manage. But a new team approach underway at University Health System clinics is showing promising results. When high blood pressure isn’t controlled, it can contribute to heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and diabetes complications. Typically, in most settings, treatment involves a brief chat with a physician, followed by a prescription for a hypertension medicine. Controlling blood pressure, however, is more successful when a number of factors are addressed. The team approach being studied at University Health System involves getting the physician a little help. That includes …Read More >

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A medical professional bottle feeds a newborn baby at the hospital

Strengthening mother-baby bonds in the NICU

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

The bond between mother and newborn is not only powerful, it’s important for the healthy development of the child, research has shown. But when a baby is born too soon or has other medical problems requiring a stay in the neonatal intensive care unit, fear and uncertainty can interfere with the forming of those bonds. “We see moms looking terrified,” Umber Darilek, a registered nurse at University Hospital, told Texas Public Radio reporter Wendy Rigby. “A lot of women don’t know how to approach their babies, especially when there are tubes and lines coming out of all directions.” To try …Read More >

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