Category: Research

pretty young girl sleeping or napping with hat over her face holding book or novel in park enjoying tranquility and lying relaxed on rug over green grass wearing a springtime dress

Nap happy

Categories: News  /  Research

For some, the midday call of the hammock or daybed is too tempting to resist. But is an afternoon nap good for you? For those who don’t get enough nighttime sleep — which is most of us — it would seem to make sense. But in fact, the research into napping has presented a mixed picture. Sleep, of course, is vital for good health — both physical and mental. It keeps you alert and focused. It helps process memories. It may even boost your body’s natural defenses, protecting you from illness. But studies looking just at napping have shown some …Read More >

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Heading off diabetes in the womb?

Categories: Children's Health  /  Diabetes  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

Diabetes runs in families. And for years, doctors have advised those at high risk of diabetes to eat sensibly to prevent getting the disease. Now, a new study involving several San Antonio organizations is asking a seemingly odd question that could have a major impact on the worldwide epidemic of obesity and diabetes: What if that advice should begin before birth? “We’re trying to figure out if babies are preprogrammed to have a certain body composition that depends on the maternal-fetal environment,” said Dr. Cynthia Blanco, medical director of the Neonatal Nutrition & Bone Institute at University Health System, and …Read More >

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Health in the headlines

Categories: Cancer  /  Children's Health  /  News  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

Need to catch up on the latest health news? We’ve gathered the highlights for you. Are you thinking of moving to the North Pole to avoid mountain cedar? You might want to consider nose filters. Can your nose tell the difference between hyacinth and honeysuckle at 100 yards? It might be a detriment to your waistline. Are your hunger pangs in pregnancy steering you toward the candy aisle? And a hair-preserving cap for chemo patients has been expanded for a wider range of cancer types. Allergies are making you sneeze. Would putting a filter in your nose help? — Washington …Read More >

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A more precise way to search for prostate cancers

Categories: Cancer  /  News  /  Research  /  Surgery

For men who undergo a biopsy for prostate cancer, it may come as a surprise to learn that the tiny samples of tissue the doctor removes for testing are based on an educated guess — where in the prostate that cancer is most likely to be lurking. For that reason, a standard biopsy can miss some prostate cancers. “I would describe it like the game of Battleship,” said Dr. Michael Liss, an assistant professor of urology at UT Health San Antonio who practices at University Health System. “That’s kind of where you put the needle: A-1, A-2, B-1, B-2. The …Read More >

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Ganging up on high blood pressure

Categories: Diabetes  /  Heart Health  /  News  /  Research

High blood pressure affects a third of U.S. adults. It’s undertreated and hard to manage. But a new team approach underway at University Health System clinics is showing promising results. When high blood pressure isn’t controlled, it can contribute to heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and diabetes complications. Typically, in most settings, treatment involves a brief chat with a physician, followed by a prescription for a hypertension medicine. Controlling blood pressure, however, is more successful when a number of factors are addressed. The team approach being studied at University Health System involves getting the physician a little help. That includes …Read More >

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Strengthening mother-baby bonds in the NICU

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

The bond between mother and newborn is not only powerful, it’s important for the healthy development of the child, research has shown. But when a baby is born too soon or has other medical problems requiring a stay in the neonatal intensive care unit, fear and uncertainty can interfere with the forming of those bonds. “We see moms looking terrified,” Umber Darilek, a registered nurse at University Hospital, told Texas Public Radio reporter Wendy Rigby. “A lot of women don’t know how to approach their babies, especially when there are tubes and lines coming out of all directions.” To try …Read More >

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Bridging the gap between young and old

Categories: News  /  Research

In this youth-obsessed culture, it’s not too surprising that some young people view older people with disdain. The problem, some researchers say, is when that “ageism” results in negative discrimination, or if younger people develop an unhealthy fear of getting older themselves. Or worse, when older people are exposed to negative stereotypes about aging — and even come to accept them as true — their health and memory can worsen. Some studies have found it can even shorten their life expectancy. A newly published study by researchers across the country, including one with the Health Collaborative in San Antonio, examined …Read More >

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Rising numbers of serious injuries reported

Categories: Emergency care  /  News  /  Research  /  trauma

The number of seriously injured children and adults brought to University Hospital’s Level 1 trauma center has increased in each year over a five-year span. And even when accounting for population growth in the region, the rate of those injuries has also been rising year after year. Those were among the main findings from University Health System’s Third Annual Community Trauma Report, which was publicly released at a news conference Thursday. The report looks at major causes of serious injuries and trends in South Texas over a five-year period, using data from thousands of trauma patients seen at University Hospital. …Read More >

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Study will look at slowing blood loss after serious injuries

A new research study about to begin in Bexar and surrounding counties will examine whether a drug already approved for slowing blood loss in other conditions will reduce the risk of death in adult trauma patients in shock from severe bleeding. The Study of Tranexamic Acid during Air Medical Prehospital Transport Trial — or STAAMP Trial — is a national study designed to test the use of the drug in critically injured patients in shock during air transport to a trauma center. University Hospital, San Antonio AirLife and The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio will conduct …Read More >

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Tourniquet

Rethinking tourniquets

Categories: Emergency care  /  News  /  Research  /  Surgery

The use of tourniquets to stop massive bleeding and save lives goes back centuries. But in modern times, their use has been a bit controversial — mainly because of some reports that they can damage nerves and tissue. In the military, however, tourniquets saw increased use in Iraq and Afghanistan — with studies demonstrating their effectiveness on the battlefield. And while civilian use has lagged because of those lingering concerns, interest has grown — particularly in the wake of mass-casualty events such as the Boston Marathon bombing. “The controversy regarding their use in the civilian realm lies in the degree of …Read More >

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