Category: Surgery

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What you need to know about pediatric sports injuries

Categories: Blog  /  Children's Health  /  Emergency care  /  Surgery  /  trauma

This post was first published by Alamo City Moms Blog. A new school year also brings a new season of fall sports. Parents are gearing up for evening practice shuttling, weekends of sideline cheering, and spirited wardrobe upgrades. As much as kids and parents love their sports, the potential for a sports injury is never far from most parents’ minds. Here is some great information from our partners at University Health System and their Pediatric Orthopedic team. University Children’s Health Orthopedic team offers specialized medical care for children who injure themselves playing or participating in sports with a focus of getting …Read More >

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A safer way to repair hearts and reduce the risk of kidney damage

Categories: Heart Health  /  News  /  Surgery  /  Technology

The ability of doctors to thread catheters and stents through blood vessels has transformed medicine — often providing an alternative to big incisions and long recovery times. More than a million catheterizations to repair the heart and its vessels are performed in the United States each year. But for some patients with kidney disease, those catheter procedures come with a big asterisk. Contrast dye, used to allow doctors to see blockages and other problems, can be toxic. Healthy kidneys can flush the dye out of the body quickly after a procedure. But for patients with poorly functioning kidneys, the dye …Read More >

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A more precise way to search for prostate cancers

Categories: Cancer  /  News  /  Research  /  Surgery

For men who undergo a biopsy for prostate cancer, it may come as a surprise to learn that the tiny samples of tissue the doctor removes for testing are based on an educated guess — where in the prostate that cancer is most likely to be lurking. For that reason, a standard biopsy can miss some prostate cancers. “I would describe it like the game of Battleship,” said Dr. Michael Liss, an assistant professor of urology at UT Health San Antonio who practices at University Health System. “That’s kind of where you put the needle: A-1, A-2, B-1, B-2. The …Read More >

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Fixing a faulty valve

Categories: Heart Health  /  News  /  rehabilitation  /  Surgery

Healthy hearts need healthy valves. But when those valves start to malfunction, it can cause symptoms that may not lead people to think of the correct cause. “People tend to think that this is old age and they don’t get it checked out,” said Dr. Edward Sako, professor of cardiothoracic surgery at UT Health San Antonio who practices at University Health System. “The patient may feel fine.” Dr. Sako said people face two common problems with their heart valves. One is stenosis, or narrowing, where the valve doesn’t open well. The other is regurgitation, where it doesn’t close well. It …Read More >

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Cloud Walkers

Cloud Walkers reach peak of Mount Kilimanjaro

Categories: News  /  rehabilitation  /  Surgery  /  trauma

A remarkable journey by a San Antonio-area group ended Tuesday at the peak of Mount Kilimanjaro, the tallest mountain in Africa. Reaching that peak would be an incredible achievement for anyone. But this team of climbers had an additional burden as its members made the 16,000-foot climb. They are amputees, having overcome the loss of arms or legs to injury or disease. The group, named Cloud Walkers, is made up of members of the San Antonio Amputee Foundation. University Health System is a major sponsor of the expedition, which includes former patients and volunteers. The group began the climb Dec. 29. The …Read More >

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When a child’s Christmas wish is a transplant

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  Surgery  /  Transplants

While most of us are caught up in the whirlwind of last-minute shopping and holiday plans this week, nine children on the transplant list are hoping for a different and very generous gift — either from a living donor or from someone who has made the decision to donate their organs after passing away. Most of these children must come to University Hospital three times a week and spend several hours connected to a dialysis machine to survive. Dialysis is an artificial process that does the work of healthy kidneys to filter toxins from the blood. “Dialysis is a blessing because …Read More >

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Study will look at slowing blood loss after serious injuries

A new research study about to begin in Bexar and surrounding counties will examine whether a drug already approved for slowing blood loss in other conditions will reduce the risk of death in adult trauma patients in shock from severe bleeding. The Study of Tranexamic Acid during Air Medical Prehospital Transport Trial — or STAAMP Trial — is a national study designed to test the use of the drug in critically injured patients in shock during air transport to a trauma center. University Hospital, San Antonio AirLife and The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio will conduct …Read More >

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Replacing a leaky valve without surgery

Categories: Children's Health  /  Heart Health  /  News  /  Surgery  /  Technology

Like a lot of children with congenital heart defects, Christian Encizo faced the prospect of multiple open heart surgeries throughout his life. He was born with pulmonary stenosis, a faulty valve linking the right ventricle of the heart and the lungs. At age 6, he had his first major operation to replace the bad valve with an artificial one. Earlier this year, Christian, now 11, began getting tired and short of breath. The old valve was beginning to leak and needed to be replaced. But rather than undergo another open heart surgery, Christian now had an alternative, his doctors at …Read More >

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Tourniquet

Rethinking tourniquets

Categories: Emergency care  /  News  /  Research  /  Surgery

The use of tourniquets to stop massive bleeding and save lives goes back centuries. But in modern times, their use has been a bit controversial — mainly because of some reports that they can damage nerves and tissue. In the military, however, tourniquets saw increased use in Iraq and Afghanistan — with studies demonstrating their effectiveness on the battlefield. And while civilian use has lagged because of those lingering concerns, interest has grown — particularly in the wake of mass-casualty events such as the Boston Marathon bombing. “The controversy regarding their use in the civilian realm lies in the degree of …Read More >

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Finding hepatitis C

Categories: Cancer  /  Infections  /  News  /  Research  /  Surgery  /  Transplants

All Baby Boomers should be screened for hepatitis C, according to federal recommendations. That’s because an estimated three-quarters of infections are in people born between 1945 and 1965, and most patients don’t know they’re infected. So far, most of that screening has taken place in clinics and doctors’ offices. But a newly published pilot study at University Hospital found that screening hospital patients for hepatitis C can catch many infections that outpatient testing misses. “We tested about 95 percent of the people who’d never been screened before,” said Dr. Barbara Turner, an internal medicine physician and professor of medicine at …Read More >

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