Health in the headlines

Categories: Cancer  /  Children's Health  /  News  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

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Need to catch up on the latest health news? We’ve gathered the highlights for you. Are you thinking of moving to the North Pole to avoid mountain cedar? You might want to consider nose filters. Can your nose tell the difference between hyacinth and honeysuckle at 100 yards? It might be a detriment to your waistline. Are your hunger pangs in pregnancy steering you toward the candy aisle? And a hair-preserving cap for chemo patients has been expanded for a wider range of cancer types.

Allergies are making you sneeze. Would putting a filter in your nose help? — Washington Post, July 1

Bring on the exercise, hold the painkillers — New York Times, July 5

Does my sense of smell make me look fat? — Los Angeles Times, July 5

Poor sleep tied to increased Alzheimer’s risk — New York Times, July 5

Could a Sweet Tooth in Pregnancy Spur Allergies in Kids? — Medline Plus, July 6

FDA clears expanded use of cooling cap to reduce hair loss during chemotherapy — FDA News, July 3

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