Tag archives for: diabetes,

Dr. Eugenio Cersosimo

Stopping trouble before it begins

Categories: Diabetes  /  News  /  Research

Diabetes is called a silent epidemic because many people don’t know they have it until the disease does considerable harm to their organs and blood vessels over many years. But for others who fall into the category doctors call prediabetes, they can see it coming. And researchers at the Texas Diabetes Institute are looking at ways of helping them keep it at bay. “It’s very important to be able to find people early, to be able to help them, because once diabetes begins there is no prevention. It’s all treatment,” Dr. Alberto Chavez-Velasquez, an endocrinol ogist and associate professor of medicine …Read More >

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Older adults preparing a healthy meal

Schooling adults on the best ways to lose weight and stay healthy

Categories: Diabetes  /  Heart Health  /  News  /  Research

For more than 20 years, a bilingual school health program known as Bienestar, the brainchild of Dr. Roberto Trevino, has been teaching elementary and middle school students throughout San Antonio and South Texas the skills to stay healthy and avoid the twin epidemics of obesity and diabetes. University Health System provided some early funding and support for the work. On Valentine’s Day, Dr. Trevino — director of the Social & Health Research Center in San Antonio — held a news conference at University Health System’s Texas Diabetes Institute to discuss a newly published study that took elements of his Bienestar program …Read More >

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A female doctor smiles and holds a newborn baby in a medical facility

Heading off diabetes in the womb?

Categories: Children's Health  /  Diabetes  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

Diabetes runs in families. And for years, doctors have advised those at high risk of diabetes to eat sensibly to prevent getting the disease. Now, a new study involving several San Antonio organizations is asking a seemingly odd question that could have a major impact on the worldwide epidemic of obesity and diabetes: What if that advice should begin before birth? “We’re trying to figure out if babies are preprogrammed to have a certain body composition that depends on the maternal-fetal environment,” said Dr. Cynthia Blanco, medical director of the Neonatal Nutrition & Bone Institute at University Health System, and …Read More >

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A chubby boy pretends to flex his biceps with tomatoes

A summer camp to keep diabetes at bay

Categories: Children's Health  /  Diabetes  /  News

Diabetes is a major health problem in South Texas, one that tends to run in families. Just as alarming is the large army of children in our community on the path of developing this devastating disease. Camp PowerUp isn’t the only program developed to prevent these kids from developing diabetes, but it might be the most fun. The weeklong summer day camp for high-risk kids started in San Antonio three years ago and has expanded to cities across the country. The kids play games and learn about diabetes, healthy eating and the importance of physical activity to stay healthy. And …Read More >

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A male doctor discusses the contents of a pamphlet with a female patient in the examination room

Why prediabetes is the next big thing

Categories: Diabetes  /  News

You may have heard the term “prediabetes” recently. Maybe you thought, why should I be worried about a disease I don’t yet have? Think again. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that 86 million — yes, million — Americans have prediabetes and aren’t aware of it. All of those people are at very high risk of developing the disease. Now the medical community is trying to get to those folks before they become full-blown diabetics, working to promote better eating and exercise. Researchers at University Health System’s Texas Diabetes Institute have launched a study to find out if …Read More >

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An old school vintage coffee mug filled with black coffee

Coffee with a clear conscience

Categories: News  /  Wellness

That coffee habit of yours? It’s probably good for you — minus the sugar, the milk, the whipped cream and the high-calorie flavor shots. That’s the view of the federal nutrition advisory panel, which recently released its updated recommendations on what people should and shouldn’t eat and drink. And while most of the headlines focused on the panel’s findings that people should consume less sugar, it also devoted some attention to the fact that drinking three to five cups a day is not only unlikely to hurt you, it’s also associated with a lower mortality risk and appears to be protective against …Read More >

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Two glasses of sparkling water with lemon sit on a table on a summer day

Swimming in sweetness

Categories: Children's Health  /  Heart Health  /  News  /  Wellness

So how much sugar is lurking in the things you eat and drink? It adds up. That popular sports drink, for example, has five teaspoons of sugar. That orange soda contains a whopping 13 teaspoons. Last year, the World Health Organization recommended that healthy adults consume no more than six teaspoons of sugar per day — half the amount of their previous recommendation. The American Heart Association recommends no more than six to nine teaspoons per day. (UPDATE: The federal government’s advisory panel on nutrition released new recommendations Thursday, for the first time advising specific limits on added sugar, saying it should …Read More >

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Up close view of a microscope offering different levels of zoom and focus

Working to improve a promising new diabetes drug

Categories: Diabetes  /  News  /  Research

A new type of drug that has been the focus of much study by San Antonio researchers takes a fairly straightforward approach to treating diabetes. It sends excess sugar down the drain. Literally. Over the past two years, three different oral drugs in a class known as SGLT2 inhibitors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration — and more are on the way, said Dr. Eugenio Cersosimo, associate professor of medicine at the UT Health Science Center, and clinical research director at University Health System’s Texas Diabetes Institute. While the liver, pancreas, muscle and fat cells all …Read More >

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Multiple maroon and spotted white tablets are arranged in a table formation

The search for the best diabetes medicine

Categories: Diabetes  /  News  /  Research

An explosion of new drugs for type 2 diabetes have come on the market in recent years, leaving doctors and patients with a dilemma — which one should I use? The question isn’t so much about the first drug doctors prescribe. Guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and other professional groups around the world say that metformin should be the first drug offered to patients. Metformin, which has been used in Europe for decades, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1994. Much of the research leading to that approval was led by Dr. Ralph DeFronzo, deputy …Read More >

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A mother holds her newborn child in the birthing room for the first time and both are smiling

Helping women with a common fertility problem

Categories: News  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

A breast cancer drug may help women with polycystic ovary syndrome achieve a successful pregnancy better than the standard treatment, new research suggests. Polycystic ovary syndrome is one of the most common causes of infertility, affecting 5 to 10 percent of women of childbearing age. The condition, often linked to diabetes, is caused in part by a hormonal imbalance. In PCOS, the ovaries make high levels of androgens — primarily a male hormone that women also produce, typically in small quantities. The standard treatment has long been a drug called clomiphene citrate, which stimulates ovulation. But its success rate is limited. …Read More >

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