Tag archives for: diabetes,

Multiple maroon and spotted white tablets are arranged in a table formation

The search for the best diabetes medicine

Categories: Diabetes  /  News  /  Research

An explosion of new drugs for type 2 diabetes have come on the market in recent years, leaving doctors and patients with a dilemma — which one should I use? The question isn’t so much about the first drug doctors prescribe. Guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and other professional groups around the world say that metformin should be the first drug offered to patients. Metformin, which has been used in Europe for decades, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1994. Much of the research leading to that approval was led by Dr. Ralph DeFronzo, deputy …Read More >

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A mother holds her newborn child in the birthing room for the first time and both are smiling

Helping women with a common fertility problem

Categories: News  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

A breast cancer drug may help women with polycystic ovary syndrome achieve a successful pregnancy better than the standard treatment, new research suggests. Polycystic ovary syndrome is one of the most common causes of infertility, affecting 5 to 10 percent of women of childbearing age. The condition, often linked to diabetes, is caused in part by a hormonal imbalance. In PCOS, the ovaries make high levels of androgens — primarily a male hormone that women also produce, typically in small quantities. The standard treatment has long been a drug called clomiphene citrate, which stimulates ovulation. But its success rate is limited. …Read More >

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A person holds a syringe as they prepare to inject themselves with insulin

Stable blood sugar? There’s almost an app for that

Categories: Children's Health  /  Diabetes  /  News  /  Research  /  Technology

Technology moved a little closer to the long-sought goal of helping diabetics maintain something close to normal blood sugar levels, around the clock, without the ordeal of endless finger sticks and insulin injections. And yes, it involves an iPhone app. Although not yet available, researchers at Boston University reported in the New England Journal of Medicine this week they had achieved much more stable blood sugar levels with a “bionic pancreas” in two small studies of type 1 diabetics — one involving 20 adults, and the other 32 adolescents attending a diabetes camp, over the course of five days. In type …Read More >

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A South Texas medical mystery

Categories: Cancer  /  Diabetes  /  News  /  Research  /  Surgery

It’s long been a grim medical mystery in this region why rates of liver cancer are high here, particularly among Hispanics. Taking a deeper look at rates of the most common form of liver cancer across the country over a 15-year period, researchers at UT Health Science Center San Antonio found the highest rates in the nation among South Texas Hispanics. The new study, led by Dr. Amelie Ramirez, professor and director of the Institute for Health Promotion Research at the Health Science Center, used data from state and national cancer registries between 1995 and 2010 to look at rates of hepatocelluar …Read More >

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A young diabetic girl is in the process of carrying out a self-monitored blood glucose test

Both forms of diabetes on the rise in children

Categories: Children's Health  /  Diabetes  /  News

Both major forms of diabetes, Type 1 and Type 2, have increased significantly in children and teenagers in recent years, a new study finds. And while the increase in Type 2 diabetes may not be too surprising, given all the attention to the rise in childhood obesity, a similar increase in Type 1 — once known as juvenile diabetes — is a little more puzzling, especially among minority populations. The two forms of diabetes are quite different. In Type 1, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin — a hormone needed to move glucose into cells so it can produce …Read More >

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A plain cup of coffee sits on a dish with a spoon placed next to it

Can that extra cup cut diabetes risk?

Categories: Diabetes  /  News

Is an extra cup of coffee enough to cut your risk of diabetes? A new study by Harvard researchers suggests that those who increased their coffee consumption by one and a half cups each day over a four-year period reduced their risk of Type 2 diabetes by 11 percent. Conversely, those who reduced their coffee consumption by more than a cup per day had a 17 percent higher risk of developing diabetes. The study, published in the journal Diabetologia, looked back at the results of three large population studies that when examined together included almost 100,000 women and 28,000 men over …Read More >

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