Tag archives for: diabetes,

A male doctor discusses the contents of a pamphlet with a female patient in the examination room

Why prediabetes is the next big thing

Categories: Diabetes  /  News

You may have heard the term “prediabetes” recently. Maybe you thought, why should I be worried about a disease I don’t yet have? Think again. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that 86 million — yes, million — Americans have prediabetes and aren’t aware of it. All of those people are at very high risk of developing the disease. Now the medical community is trying to get to those folks before they become full-blown diabetics, working to promote better eating and exercise. Researchers at University Health System’s Texas Diabetes Institute have launched a study to find out if …Read More >

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An old school vintage coffee mug filled with black coffee

Coffee with a clear conscience

Categories: News  /  Wellness

That coffee habit of yours? It’s probably good for you — minus the sugar, the milk, the whipped cream and the high-calorie flavor shots. That’s the view of the federal nutrition advisory panel, which recently released its updated recommendations on what people should and shouldn’t eat and drink. And while most of the headlines focused on the panel’s findings that people should consume less sugar, it also devoted some attention to the fact that drinking three to five cups a day is not only unlikely to hurt you, it’s also associated with a lower mortality risk and appears to be protective against …Read More >

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Two glasses of sparkling water with lemon sit on a table on a summer day

Swimming in sweetness

Categories: Children's Health  /  Heart Health  /  News  /  Wellness

So how much sugar is lurking in the things you eat and drink? It adds up. That popular sports drink, for example, has five teaspoons of sugar. That orange soda contains a whopping 13 teaspoons. Last year, the World Health Organization recommended that healthy adults consume no more than six teaspoons of sugar per day — half the amount of their previous recommendation. The American Heart Association recommends no more than six to nine teaspoons per day. (UPDATE: The federal government’s advisory panel on nutrition released new recommendations Thursday, for the first time advising specific limits on added sugar, saying it should …Read More >

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Working to improve a promising new diabetes drug

Categories: Diabetes  /  News  /  Research

A new type of drug that has been the focus of much study by San Antonio researchers takes a fairly straightforward approach to treating diabetes. It sends excess sugar down the drain. Literally. Over the past two years, three different oral drugs in a class known as SGLT2 inhibitors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration — and more are on the way, said Dr. Eugenio Cersosimo, associate professor of medicine at the UT Health Science Center, and clinical research director at University Health System’s Texas Diabetes Institute. While the liver, pancreas, muscle and fat cells all …Read More >

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The search for the best diabetes medicine

Categories: Diabetes  /  News  /  Research

An explosion of new drugs for type 2 diabetes have come on the market in recent years, leaving doctors and patients with a dilemma — which one should I use? The question isn’t so much about the first drug doctors prescribe. Guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and other professional groups around the world say that metformin should be the first drug offered to patients. Metformin, which has been used in Europe for decades, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1994. Much of the research leading to that approval was led by Dr. Ralph DeFronzo, deputy …Read More >

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A mother holds her newborn child in the birthing room for the first time and both are smiling

Helping women with a common fertility problem

Categories: News  /  Pregnancy  /  Research

A breast cancer drug may help women with polycystic ovary syndrome achieve a successful pregnancy better than the standard treatment, new research suggests. Polycystic ovary syndrome is one of the most common causes of infertility, affecting 5 to 10 percent of women of childbearing age. The condition, often linked to diabetes, is caused in part by a hormonal imbalance. In PCOS, the ovaries make high levels of androgens — primarily a male hormone that women also produce, typically in small quantities. The standard treatment has long been a drug called clomiphene citrate, which stimulates ovulation. But its success rate is limited. …Read More >

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A person holds a syringe as they prepare to inject themselves with insulin

Stable blood sugar? There’s almost an app for that

Categories: Children's Health  /  Diabetes  /  News  /  Research  /  Technology

Technology moved a little closer to the long-sought goal of helping diabetics maintain something close to normal blood sugar levels, around the clock, without the ordeal of endless finger sticks and insulin injections. And yes, it involves an iPhone app. Although not yet available, researchers at Boston University reported in the New England Journal of Medicine this week they had achieved much more stable blood sugar levels with a “bionic pancreas” in two small studies of type 1 diabetics — one involving 20 adults, and the other 32 adolescents attending a diabetes camp, over the course of five days. In type …Read More >

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A South Texas medical mystery

Categories: Cancer  /  Diabetes  /  News  /  Research  /  Surgery

It’s long been a grim medical mystery in this region why rates of liver cancer are high here, particularly among Hispanics. Taking a deeper look at rates of the most common form of liver cancer across the country over a 15-year period, researchers at UT Health Science Center San Antonio found the highest rates in the nation among South Texas Hispanics. The new study, led by Dr. Amelie Ramirez, professor and director of the Institute for Health Promotion Research at the Health Science Center, used data from state and national cancer registries between 1995 and 2010 to look at rates of hepatocelluar …Read More >

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A young diabetic girl is in the process of carrying out a self-monitored blood glucose test

Both forms of diabetes on the rise in children

Categories: Children's Health  /  Diabetes  /  News

Both major forms of diabetes, Type 1 and Type 2, have increased significantly in children and teenagers in recent years, a new study finds. And while the increase in Type 2 diabetes may not be too surprising, given all the attention to the rise in childhood obesity, a similar increase in Type 1 — once known as juvenile diabetes — is a little more puzzling, especially among minority populations. The two forms of diabetes are quite different. In Type 1, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin — a hormone needed to move glucose into cells so it can produce …Read More >

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A plain cup of coffee sits on a dish with a spoon placed next to it

Can that extra cup cut diabetes risk?

Categories: Diabetes  /  News

Is an extra cup of coffee enough to cut your risk of diabetes? A new study by Harvard researchers suggests that those who increased their coffee consumption by one and a half cups each day over a four-year period reduced their risk of Type 2 diabetes by 11 percent. Conversely, those who reduced their coffee consumption by more than a cup per day had a 17 percent higher risk of developing diabetes. The study, published in the journal Diabetologia, looked back at the results of three large population studies that when examined together included almost 100,000 women and 28,000 men over …Read More >

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