Tag archives for: nutrition,

An elderly woman works out at a fitness center for diabetics

Healthy habits add up to lower stroke risk

Categories: News  /  Research  /  Wellness

How can a woman cut her risk of stroke in half? A recent study found it might be done by following five healthy habits. The study from Sweden found that women who followed a healthy diet, drank alcohol in moderation, avoided smoking, kept active and maintained a healthy body weight over a decade had a risk of stroke that was 54 percent less than women with none of those healthy habits. Dr. Lee Birnbaum, assistant professor of neurology at the UT Health Science Center, who practices at University Health System and wasn’t involved in the research, said the study was unusual …Read More >

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A little boy in a raccoon costume snacks on a carrot stick

Spooky but safe

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  Wellness

Once again, spooky pint-sized trick-or-treaters will soon be roaming neighborhoods in search of goodies. Unfortunately, Halloween also brings a spike in injuries and emergency rooms visits. Here’s how you and your kids can stay safe and still have plenty of fun. “It is one of the top four days of the year that children go to the ER for injuries,” said Dr. Bruce Adams, chairman of emergency medicine at the UT Health Science Center and University Hospital. The most serious injury is children struck by cars. “We see a four-fold increase in children struck by cars on Halloween,” Dr. Adams said. …Read More >

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Two kids eat strawberries at the kitchen table with bowls of fruits and vegetables in front of them

Picky eaters

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  Research

It’s no secret that young pre-schoolers can be picky eaters. But a new study by a San Antonio researcher shed a light on what those picky eaters are picking. The study looked at the eating habits of 135 children 3 and 4 years of age, from low-income families, attending a San Antonio preschool program. Using photographs to determine what exactly the kids actually ate, and software that estimates the nutrients in what they were served, the researchers were able to get a pretty good idea of their eating habits. And in a study published in the journal Health Education & …Read More >

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A toddler with a sippy cup takes a long drink of his milk

Measure the milk to prevent anemia

Categories: Blog  /  Children's Health  /  Wellness

Maybe you remember those dairy ads from a few years back: “Milk — it does a body good.” While there are lots of nutritional benefits in that glass of milk, it’s also true that too much of a good thing can be bad for your child. As a pediatric hematologist (that’s a doctor who treats blood disorders in kids), I see a number of children each year who develop a form of anemia from drinking too much cow’s milk. These are otherwise healthy children, often about 1 year of age — the time when they’re making the transition from breast …Read More >

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A pediatrician performs an ear exam on a young girl before she goes back to school

A pediatrician’s back-to-school A-B-Cs: academics, bedtime, chow (and playtime, too)

Categories: Blog  /  Children's Health  /  Wellness

Another summer is winding down, which means the kids will soon be headed back to school. It’s a hectic time for parents who have plenty to worry about, from school supplies and new clothes to vaccinations. As a pediatrician, my practice is pretty hectic too this time of year, as families fill the waiting room for back-to-school immunizations or sports physicals. But no matter how busy it gets, I always encourage parents to sit down and make plans for the upcoming school year BEFORE it starts. Some of the things I suggest they plan for might come as a surprise. …Read More >

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A stuffed gordita filled with ground beef, lettuce, tomatoes, and sour cream

Taking aim at birth defects

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  Pregnancy  /  Research  /  Wellness

Citing the fact that Hispanic babies are more prone to a serious birth defect of the brain and spinal cord, the March of Dimes has called on the FDA to require that corn masa be fortified with folic acid, as it requires for many other grain products. Neural tube defects such as spina bifida and anencephaly occur when the protective sheath around the spinal cord fails to close completely. About 3,000 pregnancies each year result in a neural tube defect. Folic acid, a B vitamin found in lentils, leafy greens, citrus fruits and other foods, can reduce the risk of neural …Read More >

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A baby lays on its stomach while holding up one finger and wearing a blue and white striped onesie

A vital ingredient for baby’s health

Categories: Children's Health  /  News  /  NICU  /  Pregnancy

Are you getting enough iodine in your diet? A new policy statement by a national physicians’ group says there’s a good chance you aren’t — and that’s worrisome if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. It could be risky for your child. Iodine is an essential element for a baby’s brain to develop normally. And if mom gets too little, it can weaken both her and her child’s defenses against certain environmental pollutants — including some found in some foods and public water supplies. The American Academy of Pediatrics said this week that many pregnant and breastfeeding women should be taking iodine supplements …Read More >

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A plain cup of coffee sits on a dish with a spoon placed next to it

Can that extra cup cut diabetes risk?

Categories: Diabetes  /  News

Is an extra cup of coffee enough to cut your risk of diabetes? A new study by Harvard researchers suggests that those who increased their coffee consumption by one and a half cups each day over a four-year period reduced their risk of Type 2 diabetes by 11 percent. Conversely, those who reduced their coffee consumption by more than a cup per day had a 17 percent higher risk of developing diabetes. The study, published in the journal Diabetologia, looked back at the results of three large population studies that when examined together included almost 100,000 women and 28,000 men over …Read More >

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A man wearing a Fitbit bends down to tie his running shoes

A personal trainer for your wrist

Categories: News  /  Technology  /  Wellness

It’s like they suddenly blossomed on wrists across America — those little rubbery bracelets with names like Fitbit and Jawbone. They’re digital fitness trackers — high-tech descendents of those little step-counting pedometers that were popular a few years back. But these devices contain sophisticated tools that measure a lot more than steps. While features between devices and brands vary, most measure the intensity of your workouts. Some monitor your heart rate and estimate your calorie needs — even the quality of your sleep. But mainly they take your own personal goals for weight loss and fitness, and help you track …Read More >

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Comparison images of a current nutrition fact label versus a proposed nutrition fact label

New food labels will make healthy eating easier

Categories: Wellness

When I was in college, studying to become a dietitian, I attended a nutrition seminar where breakfast was served. I grabbed Cheerios, skim milk, a banana and a blueberry muffin. The muffin came packaged with a label, which I read, as always — 250 calories, 10 grams of fat. After breakfast, I looked at that label again — this time checking the fine print. I was shocked! That 250 calories was for a serving size of half a muffin. WHO EATS HALF A MUFFIN? My sensible breakfast had become more than half the calories I should eat in a day! …Read More >

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