Tag archives for: research,

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Study will look at slowing blood loss after serious injuries

A new research study about to begin in Bexar and surrounding counties will examine whether a drug already approved for slowing blood loss in other conditions will reduce the risk of death in adult trauma patients in shock from severe bleeding. The Study of Tranexamic Acid during Air Medical Prehospital Transport Trial — or STAAMP Trial — is a national study designed to test the use of the drug in critically injured patients in shock during air transport to a trauma center. University Hospital, San Antonio AirLife and The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio will conduct …Read More >

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Pharmaceuticals

More good news for hepatitis C patients

Categories: Infections  /  News  /  Research  /  Transplants

In the latest of what has been a series of breakthroughs for hepatitis C patients over the past couple of years — many of them studies led by San Antonio researchers — two new papers published this week show a combination treatment cleared the virus in more than 90 percent of patients after 12 weeks. One international study led by Dr. Fred Poordad of the Texas Liver Institute and chief of hepatology at the UT Health Science Center, examined more than 400 patients without cirrhosis, or scarring of the liver. More than 300 had never been treated before for the …Read More >

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UHS_OR

A promising new treatment for cancer

Categories: Cancer  /  News  /  Research  /  Surgery  /  Technology

A new treatment for cancer using minuscule radioactive fat particles injected directly into the tumor holds promise as a powerful, highly targeted therapy with minimal side effects. The treatment, developed by researchers at the Cancer Therapy & Research Center at the UT Health Science Center, is undergoing clinical trials. The first patient, identified as David Williams, 54, was treated for brain cancer at University Hospital last week.  But the researchers believe the concept will be useful for other types of solid tumors as well. Dr. Andrew Brenner, a neuro-oncologist, is the principle investigator of the study. Other centers have been …Read More >

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Bad news for diet soda drinkers

Categories: News  /  Research  /  Wellness

A campaign by local leaders is hoping to educate the community about how much sugar they’re consuming through beverages. But before you go reaching for that diet drink as a substitute, you might want to think again. The latest study by researchers at the UT Health Science Center, looking at how diet soft drinks influence obesity, is finding a connection — but in the wrong direction. That study, known as the San Antonio Longitudinal Study of Aging, followed nearly 750 people for more than a decade. Over that period, diet soda drinkers grew bigger around the middle than those who didn’t …Read More >

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Impella2

Tiny heart pump keeps transplant patient alive

Categories: Heart Health  /  News  /  Surgery  /  Technology  /  Transplants

Mark Kennedy had finally gotten the call from University Transplant Center that a new liver was available. The 59-year-old and his wife made the hourlong drive from their home in Austin to University Hospital for the transplant. The transplant appeared to be going well. But as the surgeons were nearly finished, Mr. Kennedy’s condition began to change. Perhaps from the stress of the surgery, he went into cardiac arrest and showed clear signs of a major heart attack. He went into shock. Complicating the treatment options was the fact he was bleeding, and his new liver had not yet taken …Read More >

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St.Baldrich

Sheared for science — and kids

Categories: Cancer  /  Children's Health  /  News

What would you do in the fight against childhood cancer? For about 130 local men, women and children, the answer meant trading vanity for solidarity — and saving big money on hair products for the next several weeks. They came together Saturday to raise money for childhood cancer research, at an event sponsored by St. Baldrick’s Foundation. The foundation has donated more than $1 million to the UT Health Science Center’s pediatric cancer programs over the past five years. This year, a team calling themselves Dude Where’s Your Hair 3.0, made up of members of the South Texas Pediatric Blood & Cancer Center — …Read More >

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glove

Keeping patients safe

Categories: Infections  /  News  /  Research

New findings from a national study aimed at reducing hospital-acquired infections found that a two-step process reduced the risk of ICU patients becoming colonized with a serious common bacterium by almost half. University Hospital took part in the study. The federally funded Benefits of Universal Glove and Gown— or BUGG — study was designed to look at whether requiring healthcare workers put on gowns and gloves when entering an ICU room reduced the risk of patients acquiring two common drug-resistant bacteria. Most hospitals only require them when a particular patient is known to be already infected. Initial findings from the $5.7 …Read More >

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Working to improve a promising new diabetes drug

Categories: Diabetes  /  News  /  Research

A new type of drug that has been the focus of much study by San Antonio researchers takes a fairly straightforward approach to treating diabetes. It sends excess sugar down the drain. Literally. Over the past two years, three different oral drugs in a class known as SGLT2 inhibitors have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration — and more are on the way, said Dr. Eugenio Cersosimo, associate professor of medicine at the UT Health Science Center, and clinical research director at University Health System’s Texas Diabetes Institute. While the liver, pancreas, muscle and fat cells all …Read More >

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The search for the best diabetes medicine

Categories: Diabetes  /  News  /  Research

An explosion of new drugs for type 2 diabetes have come on the market in recent years, leaving doctors and patients with a dilemma — which one should I use? The question isn’t so much about the first drug doctors prescribe. Guidelines from the American Diabetes Association and other professional groups around the world say that metformin should be the first drug offered to patients. Metformin, which has been used in Europe for decades, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 1994. Much of the research leading to that approval was led by Dr. Ralph DeFronzo, deputy …Read More >

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Eye Test

Supplements fail to halt cataracts, study finds

Categories: News  /  Research  /  Wellness

New findings from a large, national study that included San Antonio men found that two popular diet supplements, vitamin E and selenium, had little or no benefit in lowering the risk of developing cataracts. A few smaller studies had suggested supplements, especially vitamin E, might prevent cataract development. But the latest findings, published in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology, cast doubt on any benefits. “Although vitamin E and selenium are antioxidants that are found in the eye and have been variously touted as supplements that reduce the risk of cataracts, we found no evidence that either had such an effect,” said …Read More >

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