Tag archives for: stroke,

heart-2211180

A new option for a fluttering heart

Categories: Heart Health  /  News

Atrial fibrillation is a fairly common problem affecting the heart’s rhythm. An estimated 6 million Americans have it. It’s also a major risk factor for stroke. Medication can help many with atrial fibrillation. But for others, a new procedure called Watchman offers an alternative. It creates a physical barrier that catches clots and prevents them from traveling to the brain. Dr. Manoj Panday, a cardiologist and head of cardiac electrophysiology at UT Health San Antonio, performs the procedure at University Hospital. He told KENS TV that most patients who undergo the procedure are able to stop taking blood-thinning drugs, which …Read More >

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Eaton and patient Garza2

Help for high blood pressure

Categories: Heart Health  /  News  /  Wellness

Hypertension — commonly known as high blood pressure — is the leading cause of stroke and heart attack. And while the condition is controllable, it is also silent – and therefore deadly. It’s also easy to check while at the doctor’s office, or even at the grocery or drug store, said Dr. Carolyn Eaton, a family medicine physician with Community Medicine Associates, the nonprofit physician group for University Health System. “The (blood pressure devices) in the stores aren’t bad — maybe a little on the high side for seniors,” but can indicate if you should follow up with your doctor, she said. …Read More >

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07/29/2013 105349 -- San Antonio, TX --- © Copyright 2013 Mark C. Greenberg

Healthy habits add up to lower stroke risk

Categories: News  /  Research  /  Wellness

How can a woman cut her risk of stroke in half? A recent study found it might be done by following five healthy habits. The study from Sweden found that women who followed a healthy diet, drank alcohol in moderation, avoided smoking, kept active and maintained a healthy body weight over a decade had a risk of stroke that was 54 percent less than women with none of those healthy habits. Dr. Lee Birnbaum, assistant professor of neurology at the UT Health Science Center, who practices at University Health System and wasn’t involved in the research, said the study was unusual …Read More >

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For the sickest patients, chances of dying lowest at the busiest ERs

Categories: Emergency care  /  News  /  Research

The conventional wisdom holds that if you’re suffering from a medical emergency, you should get to the closest hospital as quickly as possible. But a new study is raising questions about that wisdom. An analysis of 17.5 million very sick patients admitted to hospitals across the country found that those who went to the busiest emergency departments had a 10 percent lower risk of dying from eight high-risk conditions, compared to those who went to the least busy. For some serious, life-threatening conditions, the differences were even greater. Sepsis patients had a 26 percent lower death rate at the busiest …Read More >

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