Tag archives for: stroke,

Physicians wearing blue scrubs helping a patient walk with a walker and a brace in a medical facility

Learning to walk again

Categories: News  /  rehabilitation  /  Technology  /  trauma

For those who’ve found it hard to walk after an injury or a stroke, technology can help them relearn how to walk. The Ekso exoskeleton is a kind of wearable robot that allows patients to stand and walk. Sensors in the device control its movements as the patient shifts weight. “It’s kind of a training tool to help the patient figure out how to weight shift so that they can get back to the normal pattern of walking,” said Gabrielle Canales, a physical therapist at University Health System’s Reeves Rehabilitation Center, where the device is used. Ms. Canales has been …Read More >

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A red heart is on top of a white lifeline against an orange background

A new option for a fluttering heart

Categories: Heart Health  /  News

Atrial fibrillation is a fairly common problem affecting the heart’s rhythm. An estimated 6 million Americans have it. It’s also a major risk factor for stroke. Medication can help many with atrial fibrillation. But for others, a new procedure called Watchman offers an alternative. It creates a physical barrier that catches clots and prevents them from traveling to the brain. Dr. Manoj Panday, a cardiologist and head of cardiac electrophysiology at UT Health San Antonio, performs the procedure at University Hospital. He told KENS TV that most patients who undergo the procedure are able to stop taking blood-thinning drugs, which …Read More >

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A female doctor inputs information into a computer about a male patient

Help for high blood pressure

Categories: Heart Health  /  News  /  Wellness

Hypertension — commonly known as high blood pressure — is the leading cause of stroke and heart attack. And while the condition is controllable, it is also silent – and therefore deadly. It’s also easy to check while at the doctor’s office, or even at the grocery or drug store, said Dr. Carolyn Eaton, a family medicine physician with Community Medicine Associates, the nonprofit physician group for University Health System. “The (blood pressure devices) in the stores aren’t bad — maybe a little on the high side for seniors,” but can indicate if you should follow up with your doctor, she said. …Read More >

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An elderly woman works out at a fitness center for diabetics

Healthy habits add up to lower stroke risk

Categories: News  /  Research  /  Wellness

How can a woman cut her risk of stroke in half? A recent study found it might be done by following five healthy habits. The study from Sweden found that women who followed a healthy diet, drank alcohol in moderation, avoided smoking, kept active and maintained a healthy body weight over a decade had a risk of stroke that was 54 percent less than women with none of those healthy habits. Dr. Lee Birnbaum, assistant professor of neurology at the UT Health Science Center, who practices at University Health System and wasn’t involved in the research, said the study was unusual …Read More >

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Four doctors race a man on a gurney to the nearest operating room for an emergency

For the sickest patients, chances of dying lowest at the busiest ERs

Categories: Emergency care  /  News  /  Research

The conventional wisdom holds that if you’re suffering from a medical emergency, you should get to the closest hospital as quickly as possible. But a new study is raising questions about that wisdom. An analysis of 17.5 million very sick patients admitted to hospitals across the country found that those who went to the busiest emergency departments had a 10 percent lower risk of dying from eight high-risk conditions, compared to those who went to the least busy. For some serious, life-threatening conditions, the differences were even greater. Sepsis patients had a 26 percent lower death rate at the busiest …Read More >

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  • Sat
    20
    Jan
    2018
    2 p.m. to 3 p.m.University Hospital, 4502 Medical Drive

    Take a tour of University Hospital's Labor & Delivery floor and learn what to expect on the big day. On this one-hour tour, you will tour our Labor & Delivery Unit, tour our Mother/Baby Unit, visit our newborn nursery and review hospital policies. This tour is offered in English and Spanish. Please e-mail Childbirth Education at Childbirthed@uhs-sa.com regarding availability for other languages. Expectant mothers can bring one additional adult to the tour. Registration is not required. For reservations or more information, call 210-358-1617 or email us at: Childbirthed@uhs-sa.com

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    11 a.m. to noonTexas Diabetes Institute, 701 S. Zarzamora St.

    2nd floor Diabetes & Health Education. Cooking Class Topic: Meal Prepping for Weight Loss. Our monthly healthy cooking classes are taught by registered dietitians in the Texas Diabetes Institute's teaching kitchen. When you sign up for just $5, you'll receive a cooking demonstration, recipes to take home and food samples. Seats are limited, so call today to reserve your place. Some classes are available in Spanish. The $5 fee should be paid at the Texas Diabetes Institute cashier's office prior to the start of the class. To reserve a seat or for more information, call 210-358-7100.

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