Tag archives for: technology,

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Learning to walk again

Categories: News  /  rehabilitation  /  Technology  /  trauma

For those who’ve found it hard to walk after an injury or a stroke, technology can help them relearn how to walk. The Ekso exoskeleton is a kind of wearable robot that allows patients to stand and walk. Sensors in the device control its movements as the patient shifts weight. “It’s kind of a training tool to help the patient figure out how to weight shift so that they can get back to the normal pattern of walking,” said Gabrielle Canales, a physical therapist at University Health System’s Reeves Rehabilitation Center, where the device is used. Ms. Canales has been …Read More >

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hearing aid

High-tech help for hearing

Categories: Blog  /  Technology

What do cell phones, TV’s, and hearing aids have in common? They are all getting smaller and smarter with new advances every year. Gone are the days of oversized hearing aids. Say hello to small, sleek devices that are often virtually unnoticeable. Not only have hearings aids taken a giant leap in appearance, but they have also made major progress on the inside as well. Think back at how different your cell phone is today compared to the cell phone in your pocket 10 years ago. Hearing aids have made the same progress into today’s wireless world of endless possibilities. …Read More >

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Impella2

Tiny heart pump keeps transplant patient alive

Categories: Heart Health  /  News  /  Surgery  /  Technology  /  Transplants

Mark Kennedy had finally gotten the call from University Transplant Center that a new liver was available. The 59-year-old and his wife made the hourlong drive from their home in Austin to University Hospital for the transplant. The transplant appeared to be going well. But as the surgeons were nearly finished, Mr. Kennedy’s condition began to change. Perhaps from the stress of the surgery, he went into cardiac arrest and showed clear signs of a major heart attack. He went into shock. Complicating the treatment options was the fact he was bleeding, and his new liver had not yet taken …Read More >

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airport-384562_1280

Let’s loop San Antonio

Categories: Blog  /  Technology

An estimated 36 million Americans have some degree of hearing loss, according to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Even when using the best hearing aids, some people with hearing loss continue to experience difficulty understanding in noisy or group situations. Imagine the frustration of a person who has been waiting at the gate for the airplane to board, only to learn that she missed the flight because she did not hear the overhead announcement that the gate was changed. Fortunately, technology exists to help people hear better in situations like these. Induction loop systems use a …Read More >

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UHS_TDI_insulin

Stable blood sugar? There’s almost an app for that

Categories: Children's Health  /  Diabetes  /  News  /  Research  /  Technology

Technology moved a little closer to the long-sought goal of helping diabetics maintain something close to normal blood sugar levels, around the clock, without the ordeal of endless finger sticks and insulin injections. And yes, it involves an iPhone app. Although not yet available, researchers at Boston University reported in the New England Journal of Medicine this week they had achieved much more stable blood sugar levels with a “bionic pancreas” in two small studies of type 1 diabetics — one involving 20 adults, and the other 32 adolescents attending a diabetes camp, over the course of five days. In type …Read More >

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accuvein

A viewfinder for veins

Categories: News  /  Surgery  /  Technology

It’s an unavoidable part of almost any hospital stay — having blood drawn or an IV line inserted. The process becomes a little more complicated when the nurse has trouble locating a vein. But a handheld device is making that search a little easier, allowing nurses and phlebotomists to view the blood vessels deep beneath the patient’s skin. The AccuVein device shines a small, square patch of crimson light on the skin. The technology takes advantage of the fact that the hemoglobin in the blood absorbs infrared light. Within the red square, a highway map of veins appears almost black and …Read More >

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UHS_Reeves_EKSO

Up on two feet again

Categories: News  /  Technology

It looks like something out of science fiction. But a new bionic suit being used at University Health System is helping patients with paralysis or lower extremity weakness regain strength and movement. The Ekso exoskeleton — a kind of wearable robot — allows these patients to stand and walk under medical supervision. In the process many relearn how to move and step. Sensors in the suit signal the device to walk as the users shift their weight. This gait training can help those with stroke, spinal cord injury or disease, traumatic brain injuries, multiple sclerosis and other conditions. Pedro Lozano …Read More >

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Fitbit

A personal trainer for your wrist

Categories: News  /  Technology  /  Wellness

It’s like they suddenly blossomed on wrists across America — those little rubbery bracelets with names like Fitbit and Jawbone. They’re digital fitness trackers — high-tech descendents of those little step-counting pedometers that were popular a few years back. But these devices contain sophisticated tools that measure a lot more than steps. While features between devices and brands vary, most measure the intensity of your workouts. Some monitor your heart rate and estimate your calorie needs — even the quality of your sleep. But mainly they take your own personal goals for weight loss and fitness, and help you track …Read More >

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